WHY YOU SHOULD SEND A LETTER WITH YOUR GIFT

So you’ve browsed everything on our site, and maybe you found something fun or interesting as a gift, or maybe even something for yourself, but you still feel like it does not fully hit the mark.  Here’s an idea for you that you won’t find on our site to buy, but will likely leave the recipient in tears of joy and appreciation, which happened to me…

On my 35th birthday, my wife handed me a somewhat heavy and medium-sized box to open.  I had no idea what it could possibly be, and I had told her not to get me anything, as I didn’t really want or need anything that I didn’t already have.

When I opened it, I was blown away.  Inside the box was a photo album, but it wasn’t just any old photo album that she had just thrown together.  Unbeknownst to me, she had personally reached out to all of my immediate and extended family and told all of my close friends that my birthday was coming up and asked if they could help out, and help out they did.

She asked all of them to write a brief note or letter describing their favorite memories of times that we had shared together.  Inside the album, she dedicated a page to each family member and friend and placed their letter amongst photos of times shared with the friends and family who wrote the letters.  I was literally moved to tears by seeing the effort that she and my loved ones had put into this gift.  It made me relive many fond memories and remember many things I had forgotten, and it made me feel like I had been given something intangible and lasting from every person I cared about.  Every year on my birthday, I like to go through the entire book again to be reminded of the good fortune I’ve had and to remember to always be grateful, even if you are the recipient of one of the gag gifts on our site.

On a similar note, it seems as though writing and sending letters has become a lost art.  How infrequent is it now that you open your mailbox to find a handwritten letter from someone you care about that isn’t just a thank you card, but an actual, pen-to-paper letter that conveys a sentiment that seems to pale in comparison when received by email or text?

The letter itself, now thanks to its rarity, has become a gift.  Why not take a little time and compose one to send alongside your next gift?  Chances are the recipient will appreciate it even more than the physical gift you’ve sent.

When I was a young naval officer candidate wrapping up my indoctrination into the Navy, my class was debating on the appropriate gift to give our lead instructor, who had taught us so much in such a short period of time.  Ultimately, we came up with a great idea to give him a book that was a compilation of letters written home from service men and women during war to their families and loved ones.  We also decided that each one of us in the class would write a personal letter about our time with him in Officer Indoctrination School and how he had positively impacted us.  We each placed our letters inside the book and gave it to him the night before graduation.  The next day he let us know that while he appreciated the book, he had barely glanced at it, but rather spent most of his evening reading every single one of our letters (more than 50 in total), and that he had never been so moved by a class gift, or any gift before in his life for that matter.

One last example…a few years after my grandfather had passed away, I was given his father’s old pocket watch that he had carried with him in World War I.  While I cherish this watch and feel like I’m holding a piece of history, when my uncle gave it to me, he hand wrote a 5-page letter to me on lined notebook paper, detailing much of my great grandfather’s personal life and struggles in such detail that I felt like I knew someone I had never met before, and it shed light on some of my grandfather’s life as well, whom I did know.  I still keep this letter locked close with birth and wedding certificates, because I don’t ever want to lose it.  Without it, I don’t know that the gift of the pocket watch will hold the same value.

While we don’t carry pocket watches from World War I on this site, hopefully you can take something from the above and match it with one of the items in our catalog to add to its value.

To get the wheels turning, for starters you could go with this Executive Knight Pen Holder and talk about how the pen is mightier than the sword and convey it in a meaningful way.  Just think, your boss, reaching for his or her pen, thinking of how much you are appreciated every time they reach for their pen.

Or, you could give someone this CUCOL Bamboo Watch and write a letter along the lines of, “do you remember that TIME we did such and such” or “that TIME we did TIME in jail for such and such.”

Ok, last one.  How about this Lumberjack Punching Bear Shower Curtain?  Write a letter to someone (preferably a lumberjack) who saved your life by beating up a bear with his bare (bear?) hands.  If this actually happened, you should probably go with this $200,000 watch instead.

Thanks for reading!

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